Meteor blazes across South Florida skies


Southern Florida residents have been surprised to see a meteor blazing by the darkness Monday night time, with some sharing footage of the spectacle on social media.

Dashcam and safety video revealed the fast, vivid flash of sunshine because the meteor streaked by the Earth’s atmosphere.

NASA GIVES ALL CLEAR: EARTH SAFE FROM ASTEROID THREATS FOR 100 YEARS

In a matter of seconds, the fireball had disappeared from sight. 

At 10:16 p.m. ET, a doorbell digital camera searching on a again patio in Parkland confirmed how the sky lit up and a Coral Springs Twitter consumer with a Nest digital camera recorded a special angle of its descent.

“Did you happen to see a meteor this evening? We’ve gotten a few reports about one that could be seen from #SWFL!” tweeted the National Weather Service’s Tampa Bay account. “Our #GOES-16 Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) appears to have captured the bright meteor as it burned up off the coast.”

Local reporter Jay O’Brien was streaming on Facebook Live when he captured the meteor in West Palm Beach.

“WOAH!” he stated on Twitter. “Big flash and streak across sky in West Palm Beach. Happened moments ago while we were on Facebook Live for a @CBS12 story. Working to figure out what it was.”

O’Brien’s colleague, meteorologist Zach Covey, replied and stated that the area rock was “like a piece of an asteroid often known as 2021 GW4.”

However, NPR reported Tuesday that there gave the impression to be “disagreement” over whether or not or not that was really the case.

Space.com said Monday that 2021 GW4 — which was first noticed on April 8 and is estimated to be about 14 toes across —  had harmlessly flown previous Earth and was roughly simply greater than 16,000 miles away.

While NASA notes an asteroid is a “comparatively small, inactive, rocky physique orbiting the Sun,” a meteor is the “light phenomena which results when a meteoroid enters the Earth’s atmosphere and vaporizes.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

A meteoroid is a “small particle” from an asteroid.

In common, meteors are frequent, although lower than 5% make it to the bottom, according to the agency.





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *